How to create endpoint in gnu gatekeeper MySQL database with username and password also how to save all cdr in database and required cdr columns

To create endpoints in GnuGk using a MySQL database and save Call Detail Records (CDR) in the same database, you need to configure GnuGk to use MySQL for both endpoint authentication and CDR storage. Here’s a step-by-step guide on how to do it:

Step 1: Configure MySQL Database

Assuming you have already installed and set up MySQL, you can create a new database for GnuGk and a user with privileges to access it:

sqlCopy codeCREATE DATABASE gnugk_db;
CREATE USER 'gnugk_user'@'localhost' IDENTIFIED BY 'your_password';
GRANT ALL PRIVILEGES ON gnugk_db.* TO 'gnugk_user'@'localhost';
FLUSH PRIVILEGES;

Replace 'your_password' with a strong password for the MySQL user.

Step 2: Create the Endpoints Table

Create a table in the gnugk_db database to store the endpoint information (username and password):

sqlCopy codeUSE gnugk_db;

CREATE TABLE endpoints (
    id INT AUTO_INCREMENT PRIMARY KEY,
    username VARCHAR(50) NOT NULL,
    password VARCHAR(50) NOT NULL
);

Step 3: Insert Endpoints Data

Insert the endpoint data (H.323 device information) into the endpoints table:

sqlCopy codeINSERT INTO endpoints (username, password)
VALUES
    ('1001', 'password123'),
    ('1002', 'abc123');

This example inserts two rows into the endpoints table, each representing an H.323 device with a username and password. You can add more endpoints as needed.

Step 4: Configure GnuGk to Use MySQL

Edit the GnuGk configuration file (gnugk.ini) and configure GnuGk to use MySQL for endpoint authentication:

iniCopy code[Gatekeeper::Auth::SQL]
Driver=MySQL
Server=localhost
User=gnugk_user
Password=your_password
Database=gnugk_db
Table=endpoints
UsernameColumn=username
PasswordColumn=password

Replace 'your_password' with the MySQL password you set earlier.

Step 5: Enable CDR in GnuGk

To enable CDR in GnuGk, add the following to your gnugk.ini:

iniCopy code[Gatekeeper::CDR::SQL]
Enabled = 1
Driver=MySQL
Server=localhost
User=gnugk_user
Password=your_password
Database=gnugk_db
Table=call_detail_records

Replace 'your_password' with the MySQL password you set earlier.

Step 6: Define CDR Columns

Next, create a table in the gnugk_db database to store CDR information:

sqlCopy codeUSE gnugk_db;

CREATE TABLE call_detail_records (
    id INT AUTO_INCREMENT PRIMARY KEY,
    call_id VARCHAR(50) NOT NULL,
    start_time DATETIME NOT NULL,
    end_time DATETIME NOT NULL,
    caller_id VARCHAR(50) NOT NULL,
    callee_id VARCHAR(50) NOT NULL,
    call_duration INT NOT NULL,
    call_status VARCHAR(20) NOT NULL
);

This example table includes some common CDR columns such as call_id, start_time, end_time, caller_id, callee_id, call_duration, and call_status. You can add more columns based on your specific requirements.

Step 7: Save and Restart GnuGk

Save the changes to the gnugk.ini file and restart GnuGk:

bashCopy codesudo gnugk --shutdown
sudo gnugk

GnuGk should now use the MySQL database for endpoint authentication and CDR storage.

Please note that this is a basic setup, and depending on your specific use case, you may need to further customize the GnuGk configuration and database structure. Additionally, make sure to handle database security properly, especially when storing sensitive data like passwords.

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